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tv   CNN Newsroom  CNN  July 17, 2013 11:00am-1:01pm PDT

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hands the pole to his cousin, runs into the water and trags the shark to shore with his bare hands. posted some pictures with his wrestling opponent then let it fwo back in p p he says he's caught about 100 sharks this year, most of them in florida and that he always lets them go back into the water. that's it for me. thanks for watching. see you 5:00 m. eastern in the situation. brooke baldwin picks it up from brooke baldwin picks it up from here. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com thank you. good to see all of you, i'm brooke baldwin. right to it this afternoon. florida's controversial stand your ground law is really being looked at closely. it's being scrutinized here in the wake of that george zimmerman verdict. right now, look at this. pint size and adult demonstrators and adults protesting. this is inside the capitol of florida. what do they want? they want stand your ground, that law, repealed. that law allows a person to use
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tedly force deadly force if he or she feels in danger. stevie wonder won't be playing a gig in florida until stand your ground is repeopled. the nra, national rifle association is slamming attorney general eric holder for his comments just yesterday afternoon condemning the stand your ground laws. the nra says holder is using the case for political game. george zimmerman's defense tdid not invoke stand your ground. an exclusive interview with juror b-57. let me take you straight to tallahassee, florida, our correspondent victor blackwell. he is near that capitol. victor, you've talked with demonstrators. what do they want, specifically? >> reporter: they want the
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governor to reconvene the state legislature, call a special session. and they want him to pass or sign what they pass eventually, the trayvon martin act. you know, that waiting area just outside the governor's office typically where business leaders and members of the legislature wait to speak with the governor has been taken over by political activists. they're members of a group calmed drecalm -- called dream defenders. most of them college students. they say they will not leave. they have some support here in tallahassee. i want you to listen first to the legislative director of the group and then a member of the state house here in florida. >> we'd like the repeal of stand your ground or some type of modification where we can hold people responsible to a level that, you know, humanity expects. where we don't have 17-year-olds getting gunned town with no justice being provided for them
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and their families. >> i believe that, you know, pressure -- and i believe these students are bringing the appropriate amount of passion and concern to a cause that hopefully will put pressure on the entire system to say, we must do something. >> reporter: that was representative allen williams who represents florida's district 8. he introduced a bill in the last session to overturn stand your fwround. he just wants his bill to be heard. now, the governor's office says that this issue has been dealt with. i want to read for you a statement released by governor scott's office. here it is. immediately following trayvon martin's death, governor scott called the bipartisan special task force with 19 citizens to review florida's stand your ground law. this task force listened to floridians across the state and heard their viewpoints and expert opinions on this law. the task force recommended that the law should not be overturned and governor scott agrees. governor scott is not at the
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capitol today. he has been traveling in panama city and pensacola. we asked his office when he would be back. that information has not yet come in. they say they will stay there until they get that meeting. brooke? >> victor, let me ask you a quick question about that. you talked about the panel governor scott has convened basically saying stand your ground does not need to be overturned. there was some criticism with regard to the individuals who were selected to be a part of that panel, correct? >> reporter: that's right. that's one thing representative williams pointed out. he said the legislators who were part of that 19-member group were the people who supported passing it and voted for it. and some of the people possibly on the other side of the table were not people who had any legislative power and could make much happen inside the halls of the capitol here. so the group dream defenders also says that, in short, if this is the law here in florida, florida needs to be checked. and he includes the legislators in that number. >> victor blackwell for us at
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the capitol in florida. if you read the tampa bay times today they say the stand your ground law often amounts to, i'm quoting this article here, a get out of jail free card for many defendants who invoke stand your ground as a defense. it says as of 2012, 68% of defendants go free. 66% of black defendants go free. 61% of white defendants go free. 16% conviction rate in jury trials. i want to talk about this now with criminal defense attorney eric johnson who joins me. we're going to bring another voice in here momentarily. but, eric, welcome to you. >> hello. welcome. >> thank you. let's begin with stand your ground law in and of itself. who does this law help? >> well, the purpose of the law is to protect people from feeling victimized by criminals who might seek to do them harm. however, the application of the law is what seems to be causing the problem and a lot of the issues in florida. >> the issue from what i can
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understand, you can see it two-fold. right? if somebody is, let's say, somebody is trying to burglarize my home. comes in my home. is armed. i want to protect my home. i feel threatened. i can respond with deadly force. but there is a specific difference here with stand your ground in that if i initiate that back and forth and i still then feel that i'm threatened, i can as well then use deadly force. correct? >> no. not necessarily. that was one of the issues with this case as far as the determination of who's the aggressor. >> because he got out of his car. >> that in and of itself does not make him the aggressor. the aggressor is with with regards to the physical confrontation. it's okay to get into a verbal altercation with someone that does not rise to the level of physicality. however, if you are the one who initially begins the physical confrontation, then you cannot rely on the stand your ground laws. >> wendy murphy, former prosecutor. i want to bring you in here as
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well. because is the rush of the stand your ground laws, i know we can talk about florida only because what happened in sanford. there is this law in 22 different states. is this a response to the fact that there are more and more guns out there in this country? >> you know, that's a good question. i suppose part of the desire to enact these laws is related to concerns about increased use of guns and violence. especially home invasions and so forth. but let me just toss out an idea about why i like stand your ground law. i represent mostly victimized women and children as an area of expertise of mine. the law actually creates a bit of equality in terms of force for, say, a woman or child who's being sexually violated. they have no hope of meeting force with equal force. which is what's the law in lots of states that don't have stand your ground. so when you -- when you pass a law that says that victim may well have a weapon and have a right to use it, you actually
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get more restraint on the part of sex offenders. i like that piece of stand your ground. i do think this is -- >> but it's a piece. >> it is a piece. i think -- >> go ahead. >> yes. but, i was going to say, you know, this is a bit of an unanticipated negative consequence of stand your ground in the sense that just because you have a right to use lethal force doesn't make it a good idea. doesn't mean you should. to me, george zimmerman could have done something less than lethal force to defend himself. and that's really the sticky point, i think, when we talk about these laws in a social policy sense. >> i think what i'm hearing is there are good parts of the law. there are seemingly bad parts of the law. where do we go from here? as i mentioned, 22 states have stand your ground, eric. people, as i said, are boycotting the state of florida because of this stand your ground law. what to we do? what do we learn from this? >> we need further clarification
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as to when the stand your ground law should apply. everyone afwrees to stand your ground should apply to your home and domicile. however, when you're outside in the public then i think the law needs to be specifically tailored to accommodate those situations similar to george zimmerman. >> wendy, final thoughts. you agree? >> i think what we need to talk about is whether the laws can be adjusted to insent vise people who are sincerely acting in self-defense not to use lethal force if there's an alternative. i think george zimmerman had an alternative. >> eric johnson and wendy murphy. do me a favor. please stick around. want to continue this conversation. actually, we'll play a little more from that exclusive interview anderson cooper had with juror b-37. i want to get your response to some of the additional information we now have heard from her, this mother of two grown children. jurors in george zimmerman's trial were united in their ver ticket. but now they stand somewhat divided here in the aftermath. because four of the six jurors have issued this statement
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saying this. that the opinions that juror b-37 expressed in that exclusive cnn interview are precisely that. her opinions. and not representative of the others. meanwhile, that juror that we've heard from, b-37, has released this statement about her one on one with anderson cooper. quote, thank you for the opportunity to vent some of the anguish which has been in me since the trial began. for reasons of my own, i need to speak alone. my prayers are with all of those who have the influence and power to modify the laws that left me with no verdict option other than not guilty in order to remain within the instructions. no other family should be forced to endure what the martin family has endured. she did stress that she is not writing a book on the experience of being a juror. time.ast at this particular but we are not finished hearing her side of what happened in that jury room. she has a lot to say. so much, in fact, that we are dedicating much of this hour to
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more of her exclusive interview with cnn. so let's begin. here's anderson cooper. >> did you cry in that jury room? >> i cried after the verdict. i didn't cry out when they were reading the verdict out in the jury room. because we were all crying before we went in. and then -- >> what do you mean you were crying before you went in? >> well, we were in a separate room when -- when the foreman handed the bailiff our verdict. and then we were crying back there before we went into the jury room. so they gave us about 20 minutes to try and get everything together. >> what to you think you were crying about? >> the pressure. the pressure of all of it. everything just kind of came to a head. because i kind of tried to keep everything out, emotionally out, during the whole process. then it just flooded in after it was done. >> but you want people to know,
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and the reason you're speaking is, you want people to know how seriously you took this. >> i do. i don't want people to think that we didn't think about it and we didn't care about trayvon martin. because we did. we're very sad that it happened to him. >> and you want his family to know that as well? >> i do. and i feel bad that we can't give them the verdict that they wanted. but legally we could not do that. >> do you think trayvon martin played a role in his own death? this wasn't just something that happened to him, this is something he also -- >> oh, i believe he played a huge role in his death. he could have -- when george confronted him, he could have walked away and gone home. he didn't have to do whatever he did and come back and be in a fight. >> and the other jurors felt that as well? >> they did.
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i mean, as far as i -- my perspective of it, they did. >> so you think based on the testimony you heard, you believe that trayvon martin was the aggressor? >> i think the roles changed. i think -- i think george got in a little bit too deep. which he shouldn't have been there. but trayvon decided that he wasn't going to let him scare him. and get the one over up on him or something. and i think trayvon got mad and attacked him. >> you called george zimmerman george. do you feel like you know him? >> i do. i feel like i know everybody. >> you called trayvon trayvon as well. >> i did. trayvon wasn't as well known by us because there wasn't as much said about him. all we really heard about trayvon was the phone call that he had and the evidence they had found on him. we basically had no information
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what kind of a boy trayvon was, what he did. we knew where he went to school. that was pretty much about it. and he lived in miami. >> what would you say to trayvon martin's parents. to tracy and sybrina. >> i was say i'm terribly sorry for your loss. it's a tragedy. that's pretty much all i can say. because i don't -- you know, i didn't know him. but i felt their pain because of his death. >> what do you hope for for george zimmerman now? >> i hope he gets some peace. because i'm sure he's going to be onslaught by media for months at a time. i hope his family can live a normal life after a while. i don't know how he's ever going to do that. but i hope he can. he'll never forget, but i hope
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he can. >> coming up next, hear what that juror says that this entire jury of six women thought of the pictures of george zimmerman's injuries. the answer might surprise you. stay with me. i dbefore i dosearch any projects on my home. i love my contractor, and i am so thankful to angie's list for bringing us together. find out why more than two million members count on angie's list. angie's list -- reviews you can trust. i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i looked at my options. then i got a medicare supplement insurance plan.
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available now at meineke.com. george zimmerman may have done some things wrong but none of his actions actually broke the law. here now more of anderson cooper's interview. >> do you have any doubt that george zimmerman feared for his life? >> i have no doubt george feared for his life and the situation he was in the at the time. >> when the prosecution in their closing argument is holding up the skittles and holding up the can of iced tea and saying this is what trayvon martin was armed with, this is a kid who had skittles and iced tea, you felt george zimmerman -- did you find that compelling at all or did you find mark o'mara with the
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concrete block compelling? >> mark with the concrete block, definitely. it's just the skittles and the arizona can were ridiculous to even put it up and compare the two. i mean, anybody can be armed with anything. you could bash somebody's head against a tree or a rock or this concrete. >> you believe that trayvon martin was slamming george zimmerman's head against the concrete without a doubt? >> i believe he hit his head on the concrete. i think he was probably trying to slam it. i don't know how hard george's head hit on the concrete. it hit enough to get damage, bruising, swelling. i think it's -- you know, it was definitely enough to make you fear when you're in that situation. >> the photos of george zimmerman, the photos of his injuries, to you those were -- were those something you also looked at in the jury room? >> we did. we did. we did all the -- that kind of evidence first. then we listened to all the tapes afterwards.
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>> and that was important to you because that also made you believe george zimmerman was legitimate in fearing for his life? >> i believed it. i believe because of his injuries. >> can you talk about the process of the other jurors changing their minds? i mean, you talked about the first juror went from second-degree murder to manslaughter. then you put out the question to the judge for manslaughter. and then it was basically because of the jury's reading of the law that everybody finally decided manslaughter doesn't hold? >> that's exactly why. >> was there any holdout? >> there was a holdout. and probably -- well, we had another vote. and then everybody voted putting in a little tin. we had a little tin folder of little papers and put in the vote. she was the last one to vote.
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and it took probably another 30 minutes for her to decide that she could not find anything else to hold george on because you want to find him guilty of something. she wanted to find him guilty of something, but couldn't because of the law. the way the law is written. he wasn't responsible for negligible things he had done leading up to that point. >> did you also want to find him guilty of something? >> i wanted to find him guilty of not using his senses. but you can't fault anybody -- i mean, you can't charge anybody for not being, i guess, i don't know. you can't fault him -- you can't fault -- you can't charge him with anything. because he didn't do anything unlawful. >> you're saying he overreacted or maybe was too eager, made bad choices, but it wasn't against the law. >> exactly. that's exactly what happened.
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>> you're saying maybe it wasn't right -- it wasn't right getting out of that car, but it wasn't against the law? >> exactly. he started the ball rolling. he could have avoided the whole situation by staying in the car. but he wanted to do good. i think he had good in his heart. he just went overboard. coming up next, more from juror b-37 including what she thought when trayvon martin's mother took the stand and whether she thought any of the witnesses actually lied while testifying. be right back. [ all ] who's new in the fridge! i help support bones... [ ding! ] ...the immune system... [ ding! ] ...heart health... [ ding! ] ...and muscles. [ ding! ] that can only be ensure complete! [ female announcer ] the four-in-one nutrition of ensure complete. a simple choice to help you eat right. [ major nutrition ] nutrition in charge.
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we now know what she thought of the trial. but what does juror b-37 think about all that has happened since then? the protests. talk of federal charges. and how the verdict she helped decide has reignited the race debate in america. here again, anderson cooper. >> when the defense in their closing argument played that animation of -- of what they believe happened, did you find that credible? >> i found it credible. i did. >> do you think that's what actually happened? because in that animation, trayvon martin throws the first
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punch. >> i think there were maybe some other issues and stuff leading between that. like, what exactly -- where george went exactly and where trayvon went exactly. because nobody knows where the two of them went to. but they both met in the back. i think that's where it started. >> what did you think of the testimony of trayvon martin's mother and father? do you find them credible? >> i think they -- they said anything a mother and father would say. just like george zimmerman's mom and father. i think they're your kids. you want to believe that they're innocent and that was their voice. because hearing that voice would make it credible that they were the victim. not the aggressor. >> so in a way both sets of parents kind of canceled each other out in your mind? >> they did. definitely. >> was that true for the other jurors as well? they felt those testimonies kind of canceled each other out. >> i can't speak for the other
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jurors. but i believe with the feelings and the indications that they also -- testimonies just kind of canceled each other out. >> do you think any of the witnesses lied? >> i can't think of any witnesses that lied. i really can't pick out any that lied. i think some might have heard things that weren't there because of their perspective. the stress. like when somebody is stressed from hearing a gunshot. people react differently. and so people -- you ask ten different people ten different things, you get ten different answers. >> the prosecution didn't use the word "racial" profiling during the kay. they used the word "profiling." that was something that was worked out between the judge and the lawyers when the jury wasn't in the rooms. >> right. >> do you feel that george zimmerman racially profiled trayvon martin? do you think race played a role in his decision, his view of
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trayvon martin as suspicious? >> i don't think he did. i think just circumstances caused george to think that he might be a robber or trying to do something bad in the neighborhood. because of all that had gone on previously. there were unbelievable number of robberies in the neighborhood. >> there's talk of the justice department perhaps filing civil rights violation charges against george zimmerman. do you think george zimmerman violated trayvon martin's civil rights? >> i don't think he did. he don't think he did at all. i don't think he profiled him as a racial thing. i think he profiled him just as somebody in the neighborhood that was suspicious. >> so when he said these f'ing punks, they always get away with it, he wasn't referencing race? he was referencing young people who had broken in -- >> i think he was referencing frustration because of everything that had been happening in the neighborhood. i think he was down to the point
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where he wanted -- he wanted somebody to take -- you know, get blamed and get caught. so maybe some of this would stop. >> as you know, there have been demonstrations in a lot of cities the last day or so. i don't know if you've seen some of the images of them. people holding up signs saying that african-american males are unsafe on the streets. or that, you know, one columnist who was on my program last night said -- who's african-american said he had to have that conversation with his sons about what speed is it okay for them to walk. you know, is too slow is suspicious? too fast is suspicious as well. do you think any of that is -- do you understand what that is, where that comes from? or do you think race had nothing to do with this and therefore this doesn't say anything about african-americans -- >> i don't think race had anything to do with this trial. just because he was black,
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george was spanish or puerto ric rican, i don't think it had anything to do with this trial. but i think people are looking for things to make race play a part in this trial. coming up next, this woman responding to criticism from her fellow jurors. and she is addressing reports of a book deal. my panel weighs in right after this. hey, buddy? oh, hey, flo. you want to see something cool? snapshot, from progressive. my insurance company told me not to talk to people like you. you always do what they tell you? no... try it, and see what your good driving can save you.
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all right. i've been sitting here. i've been reading your tweets. you've been watching this interview. no doubt there is out rage over the choice made by the six zimmerman jurors. if you hear what five of them say now, there is no choice they had to acquit him. here's a portion of juror b-37's statement now. quote, my prayers are with all of those who have the influence and power to modify the laws that left me with no verdict option other than not guilty in order to remain within the instructions. and i want you to listen again here to what happened with the woman who juror b-37 called the
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holdout. here she is. >> you want to find him guilty of something. she wanted to find him guilty of something, but couldn't because of the law. the way the law is written. he wasn't responsible for negligible things he had done leading up to that point. >> i want to go back now to our former prosecutor, wendy murphy. criminal defense attorney eric johnson. wendy, you hear this jury b-37 talks about the holdout. we know three of these people came in the deliberations room ultimately thought it should be manslaughter or murder two. what to you make of that? this holdout kept going back to the law, had questions about the law? >> you know, i think it's because when you think about this case from a moral perspective, you really do think there should be a law somewhere that allows for something. i think maybe criminal harassment could have been charged as a lesser offense. probably would have been easily found not guilty. frankly had he been charged in massachusetts, he probably would have been found guilty of manslaughter for using excessive force in self-defense. in stand your ground states, you
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know, they really were mandated. there's no doubt about it. she's correct. they were mandated, commanded by the judge to find him not guilty. because he had a right to use lethal force even if he didn't think he was about to die. even if he only thought he was going to suffer a serious head injury. that's the law in 21 states. >> stand your ground, eric, she had talked to anderson saying the jury instructions were confusing. they had the one question as to manslaughter on saturday. wasn't a clear enough question. they came back and ultimately we got the not guilty verdict. do you think there's room for improvement there or the law is the law? >> i think there's room for improvement. what the judge actually -- what the judge did in response to their question. normally in this type of situation the judge will bring a jury back out and reread the charge to give them some clarification. by them not doing that in this matter, they forced the jury in their position that they didn't have any clarification and they had to go the way that they went. >> let me play both of you
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something else. something else juror b-37 told anderson. >> george zimmerman in taking out his gun and pulling the trigger did nothing wrong? >> i'm 101% that he was -- that he should have done what he did except for the things that he did before. >> you mean he shouldn't have gotten out of the car. he shouldn't have pursued trayvon martin. but in the final analysis, in the final struggle -- >> when the end came to the end -- >> he was justified? >> he was justified in shooting trayvon martin. >> wendy, 101%. that is pretty darn certain. what did you think when you heard that for the first time? >> the only thing i can think of, there are a couple of issues. one is she's a woman. she's thinking if that were me, if i'm on the ground, someone's punching me, my head is cracking up against cement, my nose looks
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to be broken, i think that makes us afraid. it makes people afraid that if that were me, would i probably shoot? i think i would. and i would hope not to get in trouble for it. when you put yourself in the position of george zimmerman, especially if you feel vulnerable, and women feel more vulnerable than men, then i think that's a natural verdict. if this had been a group of male jurors i think they might have found him guilty in part on the grounds that they would have said, hey, zimmerman was a big schlunk. he should have fought like a man instead of pulled out his gun. that made him a weakling. they wouldn't have liked that. >> it was interesting when she pointed out the glaring physical differences between the huge concrete block mark o'mara had pointed out and the skittles and the fruit drink. mark, something else resonated with me. she said she and the other jurors wanted to know more about trayvon martin as a young man. knew plenty about george zimmerman. had seen the pictures of trayvon
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martin, has seen the evidence. that's it. should there have been more from the state? >> i think there should have been a little bit more to personalize trayvon, to humanize him so to speak. however, you didn't want to go into too much. because this case was not about trayvon. this case was about george zimmerman. regardless of how trayvon was, his personality, school habits or anything else, that had nothing to do with the incident and the facts that took place on this day. >> eric johnson, wendy murphy, thank you both very much. i appreciate it. coming up next, could police have stopped the boston bombings before the attacks this spring? new clues tying tamerlan tsarnaev to the three murders in 2011. what investigators may have missed. that's next. plus have you seen in? the cover of the "rolling stone." so many of you are furious. some of you thinking, hey, they want to sell some magazines. "rolling stone" is now responding to the backlash. we'll have that for you coming up. [ mrs. hutchison ] friday night has always been all fun and games
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have you seen this today? we're going to show this. put it on the screen. here it is. this is the august 3rd issue of "rolling stone" magazine. we've seen this picture before. that is boston marathon bombing suspect dzhokhar tsarnaev. it's drawing all kinds of backlash. tasteless. we've also seen sickening. another word to describe this is disgusting. several words. just some of the words being used within social media to describe what you're looking at. you won't find this issue i can tell you in cvs pharmacies or teteschi food shops. both chains are refusing to sell it. this man pretty much sums up the feeling in boston. >> why the heck you going to put an alleged bomber, knowing that he's caught, and there are playing like he's a rock star?
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what kind of crap is that? >> well, we have now gotten reaction from "rolling stone." let me read this to you. this is from their website. quote, our hearts go out to the victims of the boston marathon bombing and our thoughts are always with them and their families. it goes on, the cover story we are publishing this week falls within the traditions of journalism and "rolling stones" long standing commitment of serious and thoughtful coverage of the most important political and cultural issues of our day. the fact dzhokhar tsarnaev is young and in the same age group as many of our readers makes it all the more important for us to examine the complexities o f this issue and gain a more complete understanding of how a tragedy like this happens. inside this issue is what "rolling stone" describes as a deeply researched account of how this younger tsarnaev fell into radical islam. it says on the cover, became a monster. the writer, i should tell you,
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will be on tonight with erin burnett on "out front." right now we have new details in the boston bombing case that's led to new questions. in particular, could the carnage on that finish line and all around have been prevented? did investigators in a triple murder case miss clues that could have led them to dzhokhar's brother tamerlan tsarnaev before the bombs went off? watch this with me. this is from cnn's deborah feyerick. >> reporter: john allen still remembers tamerlantsarnaev's reaction when he heard their friend had been murdered. >> he kind of laughed it off. saying brendan probably got what he deserved. making bad choices. those were the repercussions he had to face. >> reporter: tsarnaev was never interviewed by state troopers in connection with his murder. or the other two victims. allen and others we spoke with question whether the drews strewn over the dead bodies where an effective smoke screen,
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detracting investigators from interviewing people who could have put tamerlan tsarnaev scarily on the radar. did tamerlan ever tell you police had come to speak with him? what he knew about the drugs, about anything? >> no. you know, i mean, around here they call -- we call it nhi. >> reporter: which is? >> no humans involved. >> reporter: okay. which means? >> there were three drug dealers that were murdered over drugs and money. >> reporter: that, at least, was the perception. even though only one of the three victims had drug related charges. but four months after those murders, tsarnaev left boston and traveled to dagestan where it's believed he became radicalized. law enforcement sources question whether the outcome could have been different if investigators had reached tsarnaev in the first place. jamal saw victim prenden mess a few times a week. he owns the brookline lunch diner in cambridge where mess
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often ate. he says police never questioned him and so he never told them about a meeting weeks before the murders which made mess and weissman very, very nervous. >> they all were, like, nervous. at the time he was very serious. he wasn't himself. >> reporter: neither, he says, was eric weissman. co-owner of hitman glass. a high end bong company. journalist bobby black who knew weissman believes too many solid leads weren't followed. >> anyone who knew eric would know that he was in no way some kind of dangerous drug dealer. he was a college aged kid who loved weed. >> reporter: they didn't take the money. they didn't take the drugs. >> i think the police writing it off as that early on possibly may be the reason they didn't investigate further. which could have possibly prevented the boston bombings. >> reporter: the murders took place here in the house behind me on the second floor. this is still very municipal an active investigation. a source intimately familiar with the killings defends how the case was handled, saying that state and local police
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acted professionally and according to protocol. deborah feyerick, cnn, massachusetts. >> deborah, thank you. as we show you the cover of the "rolling stone" for the month of august we want to tell you we're going straight to boston for reaction next hour. we will talk to a man i came to know when i covered the boston marathon bombings, ed kelly, boston fig boston firefighter. if i know ed well, he will not mince words. meantime, it is hot. i don't have to tell you that. a heat wave rocking the northeast where temperatures are reaching upwards of 95 degrees today. thousands are being told, don't use so much water. and our cnn correspondent there, i'm afraid to ask her, emily schmidt, how hot it is. we'll find out coming up next. hi! hi, buddy! that's why the free wifi and hot breakfast are something to smile about. book a great getaway now
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then you'll love lactose-free lactaid® it's 100% real milk that's easy to digest so you can fully enjoy the dairy you love. lactaid®. for 25 years, easy to digest. easy to love. a blistering heat wave is choking the northeast and it's spreading. you might say, hey, it's summer, whatever. don't underestimate exactly how deadly this heat can be. especially when mixed with searing humidity. to make matters worse thousands of folks in the d.c. area are being told how to restrict how much water they're using because it's so darn hot. let's go to emily schmidt hopefully hanging out in the shade in washington. emily, i hear it's code orange there now. pretty serious. >> reporter: brooke, code orange. under a heat advisory in washington. it's a serious situation. definitely it depends on where
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you are. let me show you what i'm talking about. you see this heat gun which tells you beyond what it feels like to what it's like on a surface. when we're in the shade here, not bad at all, take a look at that. 78 degrees. a pretty nice july afternoon. when you come over and you're in the sun, although the clouds just -- sun went behind the clouds, we're at 103 degrees. 20 degree difference between the shade and sun. go up to that sidewalk where the brick is, where food trucks have been lined up all morning, 124 defwr defwrees. a 40 degree difference in matter of 15 feet or so. it's so hot for people having to do their jobs in a foot truck. over a 174 degree grill 13 stories up on the top of a roof can you imagine doing construction. we caught up with a couple people working there and trying to get a little relief from the heat. >> we make sure the guys keep plenty of water. we try to start a little bit earlier. usually try to finish up before 3:00. you know, the work must go on.
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>> reporter: and this heat advisory continues in washington. standard advice, brooke. dress in layers. don't spend too much time outside. drink plenty of water. you certainly feel the difference if you are not doing so today in washington. >> hydrate, hydrate, hydrate. speaking of food drutrucks, ice cream truck. >> reporter: it would come in handy. >> emily, thank you for us in washington. coming up, more than 600 new charges against ariel castro. the man accused of kidnapping those three women. holding them as prisoners in his home. apparently for a decade. find out what happened in court today. to gauge whether or not the projects will be done in a timely fashion and within budget. angie's list members can tell you which provider is the best in town. you'll find reviews on everything from home repair to healthcare. now that we're expecting, i like the fact i can go onto angie's list and look for pediatricians. the service providers that i've found on angie's list
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now so some of the biggest stories in a flash. rapid fire. roll it. a whopping 648 new charges against ariel castro. now do the math with me. grand total. 977 counts in the accused cleveland kidnapper and rapest pleaded not guilty to every single one of them. the george ordered bail to remain at $8 million. one of castro's attorneys believes a plea deal could be reached if the prosecutor does not seek the death penalty. >> we are pleased that the recent result in the grand jury did not have an inclusion of the death penalty specification. that means that ultimately any presentation that we made on mr. castro's behalf was successful.
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>> castro is accused of holding those three young women captive in his home in cleveland for more than a decade. asiana airlines is dropping its plans to sue a california tv station for using those bogus crew names in reporting the recent crash in san francisco. they broad kacast the offensive fake names which had been confirmed by an intern. both the agency and tv station have since apologized. meanwhile, airlines as well as boeing are facing lawsuits of their own. passenger are suing both for any errors that led up to the crash. to the big board. take a look with me. dow pretty flat today. down about seven points, sitting at 15,444. we know this. it's coming after fed chief ben bernanke's comments this morning basically saying that stimulus cash will be scaled back by the end of the year. can always check back with cnnmoney.com. coming up, please stay with me. a cnn special report. we are going to take a closer
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look at the heroin use across this country. you know the story here. a drug that killed "glee" actor corey monteith. it is seeing a surge in places you would not expect. heroin's deadly comeback. heroin's deadly comeback. don't miss it. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com all this produce from walmart and secretly served it up in the heart of peach country. it's a fresh-over. we want you
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she is being remembered as an adorable pint sized advocate who won the hearts of so many. thalia joy casiano has died in
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orlando, florida, six years after being diagnosed with cancer. she was named an honorary cover girl after gaining internet fame by offering makeup tips for kids with cancer on youtube. i want you to listen to how she dealt with going bald after her chemotherapy treatments. >> now going in public i feel proud. and i really feel that i can show my head. i mean, my head's beautiful. please. if i had hair, i'd flip it. but, yeah. i mean, i still love dancing around in wigs. i mean, i don't wear wigs in public anymore. i just feel fake. i don't know. like fake hair fake. >> talia spent the past six months in the hospital after the cancer spread to her bones. talia joy castellano was 13 years young. here we go. top of the hour.
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i'm brooke baldwin. let's get to it. florida's controversial stand your ground law is being scrutinized, of course in the wake of the george zimmerman verdict. right now there are demonstrators both young and old protesting inside florida's capitol. look at them. what do they want? they want to repeal the stand your ground law. which allows a person to use deadly force if he or she feels great danger with no obligation to retreat. in fact, we just learned today that stevie wonder says he is boycotting the entire state of florida, won't play a gig down there until stand your ground is repealed. also, the national rifle association is slamming u.s. attorney general eric holder for his comments that he made in r orlando just yesterday condemning the stand your ground laws. the nra says holder is using the zimmerman case for political gain. quick remind tore all of us. zimmerman's legal team did not invoke stand your ground as part of his defense. florida stand your ground law did impact the judge's instructions to the jury as we
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learned in that jury b-37 interview with anderson cooper. victor blackwell standing by for us in tallahassee. victor, you have talked to some of these folks who are demonstrating there at the state capitol. what are they telling you? >> reporter: in addition to the repeal of the snd your ground law they also want the state to ban zero tolerance policies in school districts across the state and they want to have an honest conversation about racial profiling. one thing you mentioned was that the stand your ground law was not used as an argument to defend george zimmerman but the leader of this group, dream defenders, holding the sit-in in governor rick scott's office says although they know that, they do not want in their words another vigilante to be able to use the law to defend him or herself against killing another unarmed person. there are about 30 of them who are sitting in his office. yesterday at 10:00 eastern they walked in, demanded to see the governor. they have not left. they did the same thing again today. they say they will do so until they get a meeting with governor scott. >> speaking of the governor we
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know he asesembled this panel last february. he got folks to take a good, long look at stand your ground. what did they come up with? >> reporter: they came up with the simple recommendation they should not change this law, it should not be overturned. there were several questions about who were the people coming up with this recommendation? of the 19, the people who were legislative officers who were either in the state senate or state house were people who supported this law or voted for it in the view of the people who were sitting in his office right now. and the people who likely would have some objection to it were not people who had a vote in the state house or the state senate. so the people who are waiting to speak with the governor say that panel was rigged from the start, from the moment it was created. >> victor blackwell in tallahassee. stand your ground was a hot topic last night at a town hall anderson cooper hosted on cnn called race and justice in america. here's a portion of that conversation.
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>> charles, when you say the system failed trayvon martin long before that shot was fired, what do you mean? >> i think you have to look at all of the contributing factors here including florida's self-defense laws. which allow someone to be an aggressor. you know, if you assume that george zimmerman was an aggressor when he got out of his car, they allow you to be the aggressor. and if you engage in a fight and you start to lose that fight, the idea of self-defense can switch personage. you had it first when i was following you and i engaged you. the moment that i start to lose, it bounces from you to me. >> in my interview with the juror, she said that's all -- that's what they looked at. what happened in those final minutes in that fight. he feared for his life. >> right. >> so he was -- >> that's a moral question. how is it possible that you
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could even write a law where you have no culpability? i'm not saying that if you feel like your life is about to be taken that you shouldn't do everything to preserve it. that's just a human thing. but you have -- you should have some culpability for starting this action and getting it rolling. there's none. >> these stand your ground laws in a sense take our humanity away, our civility away. yes, if you're in your home and someone breaks in, you have every right to stand your ground, protect your home, protect your family. but if you are out in the street, an altercation happens, you mean to tell me you don't have any civility to try to retreat? try to say, wait, wait, wait. let me get away. let's try to work this out. let's what stand your ground does. it allows you -- >> or stay in your truck. >> -- to kill. we've got to look at that. >> it sends a real message in the true sense that your stand your ground claim goes up exponentially as soon as you make sure the person is dead. >> i want to bring in mark
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garagos in the audience. as we heard earlier the federal government looked into this. black males are sentenced in federal court almost 20% longer than white males who had similar convictions. >> not just federal courts. state courts. every day in court that's what happens. it starts not when you get to court. it starts when you get arrested. where are -- who are the people who are being profiled by police? who are the people being pulled over by police? race infects everything in the criminal justice system. now to this. an alleged killer as a cover boy? what i'm about to show you is the object of condemnation that calls for a boycott today. the august 3rd issue of "rolling stone" magazine. see his face front and center. boston marathon bombing suspect dzhokhar tsarnaev smack dab on the cover. as you can imagine it's drawing all kinds of backlash. we have learned today cvs pharmacies and tedeschi food
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shops refusing to sell this. some of the words being used to describe it. you hear tasteless. another we read today, sickening. also the word disgusting. words being thrown about in social media just to describe this "rolling stone" cover. on the "rolling stone" website, let me get this in. they have responded with this statement. quote, our hearts go out to the victims of the boston marathon bombing and our thoughts are always with them and their families. the cover story we are publishing this week falls within the traditions of journalism and "rolling stone's" long standing commitment to serious and thoughtful coverage of the most important political and cultural issues of our day. it goes on. the fact that dzhokhar tsarnaev is young and in the same age group as many of our readers makes it all the more important for us to examine the complexities of this issue and gain a more complete understanding of how a tragedy like this happens. listen, if you're a reader of "rolling stone" you know they're no stranger to concontroversy. we went back through.
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some of the past covers that royaled some people. cult leader, mass killer charles manson graced the cover. also back in 1972, david cassidy. john lennon and yoko ohno. britney spears provocatively prosing at 17. lady gaga showing off a pair of guns. the cast of vampire series "true blood" covered in blood. a lot of people talked about those through the years. this isn't new. but the cover featuring the alleged boston bomber could have a much more significant impact than any of those covers of years past. take a look at this tweet. this is from former white house national security council spokesman tommy veeter. quote, isn't black and white. a disaffected u.s. kid could see this and think terrorists are afforded rock star status. that tweet was addressed to my
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colleague, jake tapper, he's of "the lead." isn't tommy veitor from boston? >> he is from boston. this is an issue for him that has personal resonance. i have to say, tommy and i have been talking on the phone about this. he'll come on "the lead" at the top of the hour to talk about this issue. he feels very passionately about this having worked in the national security staff about what he sees as what is an important part of combatting terrorism which is to send a message to young, disaffected individuals who might pursue a path of terrorism. that there is nothing good down that way. that path leads to your death, your family being devastated, and you -- basically your memory being obliterated. he says this "rolling stone" cover basically offers to people, offers to young disaffected people, a chance at immortality.
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and the picture of dzhokhar tsarnaev as you see is a rockstaresque photograph. there are people who feel passionately on the other side of the issue. that's tommy's view. he'll talk to us later today about it. >> i've seen comparisons today talk about rock star status, the comparison to jim morrison. we'll be looking for you top of the hour for "the lead" coming up. coming up, we'll stay on this topic. we'll talk to a boston firefighter, someone i interviewed when i was covering the marathon bombings aftermath. a man by the name of ed kelly. he is joining me today. his reaction right after the break. ave disrupted man. instead, man raised a sail. and made "farther" his battle cry. the new ram 1500 -- motor trend's 2013 truck of the year -- the most fuel-efficient half-ton truck on the road -- achieving best-in-class 25 highway miles per gallon.
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i have a lifetime of experience. so i know how important that is. saving time by booking an appointment online, even smarter. online scheduling. available now at meineke.com. we just talked about the cover of the upcoming issue of "rolling stone" with the younger tsarnaev brother, the younger suspect dzhokhar tsarnaev on the cover. backlash has been swift. we've learned today two different store chains of cvs pharmacies and tedeschi refusing to stock this particular magazine in stores and pharmacies. ed kelly is a boston firefighter. we chatted back in april. ed, good to see you.
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thank you for coming on. >> thanks for having me, brooke. >> tell me, you saw the picture of this younger tsarnaev. what was your first thought? >> i was disturbed. you know, really the picture that they chose, one to put him on the cover of "rolling stone" magazine was insulting as it is. it does give the depipgs to the youth of america that is something to aspire to. which definitely obviously sends the wrong message. but the actual picture they chose really portrays the innocence of youth. he gave up any innocence he had on april 15th when he took the life of an innocent child, two women. and then went on to execute a police officer. >> you know, i've read many of "rolling stone" magazine. they have incredible journalists. they say this is good journalism. they talk to all kinds of people to put this whole very thorough story together on dzhokhar tsarnaev. is there a different picture? would a different picture of dzhokhar tsarnaev been okay to
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you as a bostonian? >> it certainly would not. if they used his booking picture or the picture of him being arrested and really portrayed it for why he is, why they chose to do a story, why "rolling stone" chose to do a story on him, it was because he murdered people. because he's a terrorist. and they didn't depict him that on the front of their magazine. a picture speaks 1,000 words. what he did to a city, a country, we're never going to forgive him for it. we're not going to cower from it. it disturbs us that our media chooses to celebrate it. >> we're not celebrating it. we're telling the story. again, i wanted to go straight to you to get the perperspectiv. you were five blocks in the fire station, five blocks from the finish line when bombs went off. your wife ran the marathon and had just finished. have you talked to your wife? have you talked to other firefighters? have they seen the cover of this magazine? is your thought unique to this view or is this what everyone you've talked to is thinking? >> everyone i've talked to in
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boston feels the same way. it's an inappropriate picture of a murderer. a murderer, a terrorist, someone who killed an innocent child. maimed and wounded hundreds. and really everything that tries to subvert what is great about this country. the ability to pursue freedom and has beenness a nehappiness . that's really what that target was that day. i say shame on "rolling stone" magazine for choosing a picture of him which portrays him as an innocent youth when, in fact, his innocence is gone. he hasn't had his day in court yet. but he's a self-admitted murderer. you know, from my perspective, i know my executive board at the professional firefighters of massachusetts have taken a vote to support the boycott of "rolling stone" magazine, men's journal and "u.s. weekly." they're all tied into the same group. >> ed kelly, boston firefighter.
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friend of mine. ed, thank you. appreciate it. >> god bless america. >> thank you. coming up next, this woman now responding to criticism from her fellow jurors in the george zimmerman trial. she is addressing reports of a book deal. stay with me. dad. how did you get here? i don't know. [ speaking in russian ] look, look, look... you probably want to get away as much as we do. with priceline express deals, you can get a fabulous hotel without bidding. think of the rubles you'll save. with one touch, fun in the sun. i like fun. well, that went exactly as i planned.. really? now save up to 60% during summer hotel sale. use code "summer" on priceline's. and you wouldn't have it any other way.e. but your erectile dysfunction - you know, that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet
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jurors in george zimmerman's trial were united in their verdict. but they now want to stand sort of divided in the aftermath here. four of the six jurors have issued a statement saying the opinions of juror b-37 expressed in an exclusive cnn interview are just that. her opinions. not representative of the others. meanwhile, that juror, b-37, has released a statement about her one on one with anderson cooper. let me read this for you. thank you for the opportunity to vent some of the anguish which has been in me since the trial began. for reasons of my own, i needed to speak alone. my prayers are with all those who have the influence and power to modify the laws that left me with no verdict option other than not guilty in order to remain within the instructions. no other family should be forced
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to endure what the martin family has endured. we should also point out because a lot of you have been asking about this whole book thing. so she is also saying now she will not be writing a book at this time. sympathy was also expressed by the four other jurors. so this is a portion of the statement they released yesterday. i quote them. the death of a teenager weighed heavily on our hearts, but in the end we did what the law required us to do. we appeal to the highest standards of your profession and ask the media to respect privacy and give us time to process what we have been through. thank you. coming up next, if you have filled up lately, you have seen that gas prices are going up. how high? hear why it's five bucks a gallon in some places. ugh.
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it goes up. it goes down.
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it is costing you now more to fill up. gas prices are skyrocketing. this last week the national average for regular unleaded $3.66 a gallon. but check this out. five bucks a gallon at some stations in los angeles. sorry for those in l.a. egypt's uprising is actually what's helping push up the oil prices. crude oil supplies are down as refineries stop for maintenance. also skyrocketing, profits of bank of america. alison kosik at the new york stock exchange with that. >> these are big numbers. bank of america reporting its profits jumped more than 60% in the latest quarter earning about $4 billion helped by a strong environment for wall street deals. we are seeing share of bank of america right now up about 3%. it is one of the biggest gainers on the dow. which isn't moving too much. but bank of america is moving pretty well. >> alison, thank you. coming up next, amid the news of a "glee" star's death, our special report. a half hour we're dedicating, calling it heroin's deadly
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comeback. we'll talk with a recovering addict. actually two. counselor for celebrity rehab. in, many other voices here about the alarming rise of heroin use across america. please don't miss this. you have the potential to do more in business. by earning a degree from capella university, you'll have the knowledge to make an impact in your company and take your career to an even greater place. let's get started at capella.edu. ♪ it's about where you're going. the new ram 1500. best-in-class 25 mpg. ♪ north american truck of the year. ♪ the truck of texas. better residual value than ford and chevy.
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bottom of the hour. i'm brooke baldwin. for the next 30 minutes, we are talking heroin. we will be speaking with two former aar eer heroin addicts. we'll talk to doctors, police about the drug, the addiction and the recovery. ♪ small town girl, living in a lonely world, she took the midnight train going anywhere ♪ >> he played the singing high school football star fin hudson in the hit tv show "glee." but on saturday cory monteith's voice was silenced. he was found dead in a vancouver hotel room. behind the smile, the 31-year-old actor was battling demons. a drug and alcohol addiction he spoke publicly about. >> for me, it wasn't so much about, you know, the substances, per se.
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it was more about -- about not fitting in. it was not having -- i hadn't found myself at all. i had no idea who i was. i had no idea where i was going. >> according to this autopsy report, his drug of choice most recently was heroin. in the end, that was the drug that would end his life. when you look back through the '70s and the '80s and the '90s, look at these faces. heroin took the lives of dozens of actors, rock stars, river phoenix. john belushi, janis joplin just to name a few. cory monteith's death is highlighting once again an alarming new trend. the substance abuse and mental health services administration is reporting a sharp rise in heroin usage. a 63% increase. when you look back from 2005 to 2011. state by state by state, heroin's deadly grip is increasing. not only that, but a new face of heroin addiction is emerging. and that's why i wanted to talk
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about this today. cory monteith fits that profile. a male, white, in his 30s. we have a whole panel to talk about this for the next half hour. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen first up here taking a closer look at this deadly substance. >> reporter: in the 1970s, heroin was big news. it devastated parts of american cities. the focus then shifted to cocaine, meth and prescription drugs. but haeroin is back in the spotlight. heroin use jumped 63% from 2005 to 2011. >> what we've seen in the last decade has been in the sense a perfect storm. the po twe ten tensy of heroin s gotten higher. the price has gotten lower. >> reporter: it's easier to use. you don't have to shoot it up anymore. you can snort it. >> i think parents can't afford to be complacent or make that assumption that my kid would never get involved in heroin. >> reporter: back in the 1970s, heroin was generally thought of
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as the kind of drug people used in street alleys. but not anymore. >> that notion that it's concentrated in the inner city among the down and out is -- is less and less the case. >> reporter: as we've seen, heroin has an appeal beyond street corners. contributing to the death of beloved television star cory monteith. >> let's talk about this. we have bob forest, vh1 celebrity rehab and sober house and founder of bob forest counseling services joining me. also gary langus, recovering heroin addict. drug use researcher currently. sitting alongside him ken hansen, director of addiction services for the north suffolk mental health association. before we go to you, elizabeth cohen sitting next to me in studio seven. we just heard from you. those who know zero. just what we see in tv and on the movies. the needles on the street. heroin is an opiate. what does that mean? >> it means it depresses your central nervous system. so you get a high from it. but when you take too much of
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it, your brain forgets to breathe. i know that sounds crazy because we don't think about it. our brain tells us to breathe all the time. it actually shuts down that part of you brain and you just forget. and that's why heroin is so incredibly dangerous. >> okay. bob, i want to go to you. elizabeth, i'm going to bring you in and out through this whole conversation. i know people know you and know your face from "celebrity rehab." but you did heroin. how much of it did you do? >> on a daily basis for over a decade. i was a hard core user of heroin. and i thought it had gone away. i really did. i'm naive. i'm always optimistic about addict trends. i thought as soon as we can get a handle on these young people abusing prescription drugs we can really make forward progress. but we can't. i think why you're seeing this increase in heroin is because we've done a good job at clamping down on the pill mills in certain parts of the united states. and we've all become very aware of prescription drug addiction
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and prescription drug access for young people. now they're turning to the streets. that's what i believe. >> gary, you're helping folks in communities right now. you've been clean for ten or so years. you hear about drugs. people take them. you're addicted after the first time. is that what heroin does to you? >> not really. you can use it until you build up a tolerance to it. then you become addicted. with the pills which were just talked about, we are doing a great job with the pills. like passing new regulations. closing the pill mills. but what that does, that leads folks to a cheaper product. a more accessible product. which is the heroin. and it's really pretty easy to find. any street in america. but, again, it happens like if you take a pill which is a purer form of an opioid you'll build
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up a tolerance a lot faster probably than most of the heroin that's on the street right now. but you can become addicted in just a few times. >> i know i've been -- >> you get withdrawals. >> i've been getting tweets and people are saying this is old news. just because of cory monteith's death that people are talking about it. kim, i was having a conversation with your colleague in boston over the weekend. she was saying to me, it made me just stop and pause and think about it for a minute, so many more -- it seems like there is this uptick in young people. you counsel folks in the boston area. how young are we talking? >> well, it can start at age 13. right now in the boston area, we definitely are seeing an up rise. you know, the 18 to 25-year-olds at this point seems to be the most predominant demographic that we're dealing with. but they can start, we deaf ff e definitely have kids using heroin at 13. kids are comfortable with
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pharmaceuticals. they cannot keep up with the financial burden. the other piece fatal is combining the other pills such as the ben zo diaz peens and the alcohol. the combination, that's where the lethalness comes in as well. decrease in the respiration. >> that is according to this autopsy, it was this toxic mix of both alcohol and heroin that ultimately claimed the life of cory monteith. >> absolutely. >> he was 13 when he started abusing. >> absolutely. >> quickly, elizabeth. >> he just came out of detox. >> i want to talk about the appeal to young people. when you can only shoot up heroin, i think young people are like, who wants to put a needle in your arm? now that you can snoort it or smoke it, doesn't have that stigma. >> bob forrest, cocaine usage, that's also sort of old news. that's something you snort. when you think of snorting heroin is it more toxic? does the body absorb it differently? is that what's making this increasingly deadly for young folks who don't have the tolerance?
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>> i think speaking to what gary was saying, i don't think these young people know how to use drugs safely. >> can you use drugs safely? hang on. can you use -- >> well, to use -- to know not to combine certain deadly combinations, all add tickicts for decades. this generation does not know that. i'll tell you a story. there was an old blues musician in los angeles. i was stumbling around, od'ing somewhat like what some of these kids are. going unconscious. he really told me you cannot take this drug with that drug. i understood that. and these kids are not getting this education about drugs because we're becoming more and more of a backwards society in talking openly about these problems. we have serious problems in this country from drug addiction. >> that is why i wanted to talk about this today. but here's my question. kim, to you in boston. just, for example, using your area, your neck of the woods as an example. you're saying you're seeing folks as young as 13.
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are you seeing more black, white, hispanic, young, older, you know, different socioeconomic backgrounds? >> it knows no boundaries. it definitely has no boundaries. we're definitely seeing an increase more in the female population. it was historically more of a male predominant -- >> really? >> yes, absolutely. what we're seeing now is a total surge in, you know, an increased use among the youth and it really doesn't have any boundaries. >> how do we stop this? >> we really do have to get this message -- we got to keep talking. this is how we're doing this, brooke. we're talking. we've got to keep on talking. because it is a disease of the brain. you know, we really do -- it doesn't have a cure. we have to treat it. it's a lifelong treatment experience. you have to change everything in your life. i just think we have to keep talking about this. we have to continue to destigmatize, destigmatize for the parents, destigmatize for the colleagues. we have to get out there and send the message.
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>> what is the message? what is the message to people? gary, from you, since you somehow found the strength to kick it a decade ago. how did you find the strength? also, what's your message for parents, you know, folks who know folks? >> my message is you want to know how do we stop this? first we have to engage and unengaged population of folks. if you start to use heroin, all of the sudden the family notices. they're not interacting with the family as much. they're not going to their favorite sporting events. they're using heroin. who engages these folks? not usually too many folks. because they will, like, stigmatize them like kim was saying. you become a junky now. you're not looked at the same way as your peers. so, like, that's what we try to do now. we try to engage the populations. and we'll give them tools. the word "safe" is "safer."
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the safer ways you can use substances. there's things you can do. there's tools you can have. in massachusetts we have a program. we train drug using -- folks that are using heroin, their family members and witnesses to that, how to use a drug which reverses a heroin overdose and gives them enough time to get to the e.r. >> we also need to look at not having people discharge from rehab and be alone. because if they're alone, that's another danger. that's a strong message that has to be heard. people need people. >> as your colleague, my friend told me, you know, once you're out of rehab, your tolerance is down. you use again and that could be it. >> that's right. >> i have to leave it here for you. coming up next, cory monteith in his own words. you'll hear how the actor described his addiction. we'll talk to the man who asked monteith about his very own demons, george strombolopolous
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his death. vancouver, british columbia. some of his many, many fans including lots of young girls stopping by mourning a life cut short by drugs. george stroumboulopoulos is with me now from toronto. host of cnn's "stroumboulopoulos tonight." good to see you. i hate that we're talking under the situation that we are. but i have to ask about this interview. you talked to cory. it wasn't the first time. but you talked to him in 2011. it was a time when he seemed to have turned his life around. let me play part of your interview. >> you're so unique in this position that fame often leads to the disintegration of a person. but it seems like in your case it's having the opposite effect. >> i try and do the next right thing. you know, i just try and do the next right thing. that's all i can say. when you -- when you have this whole fame thing, it seems like so many opportunities.
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i see so many opportunities. there are many opportunities to do the next wrong thing. >> it is so incredibly tragic. when you think about it, you know, monteith, he began drinking and began using drugs. as he talked to you, he started around age 13 which is the age of a lot of his fans today. what can you tell me about his teen years and how this whole addiction developed? >> you know, about him, he was one of the loveliest ones you're going to meet, right? i know it's tragic when you lose anybody. he was kind of the good one. and cory did seem to have turned things around. i don't know a lot of the details near the end of what happened to him or what precipita precipitated, you know, those final few hours for him. but it's just sometimes the stuff just kind of comes out of nowhere. he seemed to be making the right choices in most parts o f his life. he was very self-aware. he was aware of the step by step process with which he could get better. and this is the tragedy of addiction. this is the complicated part of addiction is that everybody has their own relationship with it.
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and how you get through it is kind of -- sometimes it's not really up to you. it's a real tragedy. he was a really lovely man. >> he seemed lovely. you could tell he seemed very self-aware. i watched the whole clip when you were sitting down and talking to him. he seemed also pretty confident when he was talking about his sobriety. i'm wondering when the cameras weren't rolling or any moment in between did you pick up anything different? >> no. you know, what i learned from him, what made him special, actually, was that he was very brave. not brave in the bragadocio way. with his vulnerability. he had lots offish shoo issues with. he talked about his father and his upbringing. addiction and making the next right choice. that's the thing. with addiction you can be going down the right road for so long. it's a bad hour. look out. that bad hour could be the difference maker in somebody's life. i actually didn't pick up a single thing that said he was in
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trouble. not a single thing. i don't think at that time, the last time i saw him, it had been a minute since i'd seen him, he was in that right place. i think it was confidence in recognizing that he had vulnerabilities that he was working towards. he didn't think he had nailed life. he thought he was working towards it. and that brings a certain confidence to a guy. i just was really impressed with how brave he was in sharing that stuff on the air. as you know, brooke, celebrity for the sake of celebrity is not interesting. in those conversations when he was willing to engage, he was actually actively helping other people make better choices in their life. people who could watch and relate to some of his stuff. our culture does not really appreciate mental health issues and doesn't deal with addiction with the most empathy. we don't as a culture. when you have strong, successful people talking about it, that's how you can help end the stigma and help people get help. >> i heard he was helping. he was helping folks, richard branson was working with him on a group helping folks on the street, young people. he seemed to have such a giving way about him. and the whole thing is sad every way you cut it. george stroumboulopoulos, thank
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you for coming on television after what i think was your vacation. thank you very much. i proosappreciate it. we'll be watching for you friday night on cnn. your big guest friday, former cnner, larry king. coming up next, wait until you hear actually where heroin is being found these days. how it gets here, how it's cheap, and how police are trying to crack down.
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i'm lucy lui. we can make an impact for syrian children. syria is in a terrible situation right now. there's civil war going on that is creating absolute pandemonium. and people are fleeing into lebanon, into jordan, into iraq. 6 million people have been displaced. half of them are children. these children are suffering. they have lice. there's scabies. they've lost family. they can't go to school, aren't getting medical attention, nutrition they need. there's going to be a lost generation of children if this continues. it's our business. we share the same work, we share the same environments. if we understand that, we are actually one community, and it makes the world so much smaller and much more tangible for people to understand.
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you currently desperate for donations to syria. join the movement. impact your world, cnn.com/impact.
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we are talking this half hour about the death of cory monday teeth, and the growing use of heroin -- and one of those reasons is higher potency which allows users to get around having to shoot up. a government study, quote, since smoking or sniffing is less invasive, it may be perceived as less risky. especially among the young. joining me from los angeles, he's done some detailed reporting on it. sam, welcome. >> thank you. i read your piece from 2010. your lead line, black tar heroin, you say immigrants from obscure corner of mexico are changing heroin use in many parts of america. how?
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>> well, there's one town in particular in the small state of nairit, where guys in this town have learned how to market heroin as if it were pizza. they basically have a dispatch system, very much like you would order pizza over the phone, you call up, they have an operator standing by, basically. they have drivers circulating out in the town wherever you are, and these guys then will deliver you your dope. these fellas have used this system and a lot of very aggressive marketing techniques to spread black tar heroin farther than its ever gone before. for a long time black tar heroin was really a west coast thing, but these guys have brought it east of the mississippi river. >> to smaller towns.
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>> excuse me? >> to smaller town? s. >> they brought it to towns that really never had a heroin problem to speak of. for example, columbus, ohio, is awash. that was a major hub. the name of the town is jalisco, and i've taken to calling hem, after a police officers-coined term, as the jalisco boys, and they are in columbus, and charlotte, nashville, indianapolis, parts of south carolina, and when -- they're not just in the towns. really they only sell to white people. i think that's their focus, and they're selling to really the suburbs, so selling in columbus, but people from the suburbs are coming in to buy them. >> as you described, a smaller, entry prior neural network, not the big megacartels. sam, i have to leave it through, but coming up next, we're going
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to take you inside the crime scenes, in the crackdown on heroin. you really couldn't have come at a better time. these chevys are moving fast. i'll take that malibu. yeah excuse me, the equinox in atlantis blue is mine! i was here first, it's mine. i called about that one, it's mine. mine! mine. it's mine. it's mine. mine. mine. mine. mine. it's mine! no it's not, it's mine! better get going, it's chevy model year-end event. [ male announcer ] the chevy model year-end event. the 13s are going fast, time to get yours. current chevy truck owners can trade up to this chevy silverado all-star edition with a total value of $9,000.
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welcome back. we're talking about mike brooks, 26 years. >> 26 years, in the nation's capital. >> just telling a story about a guy shooting up driving around dupont circle. what is it like, if you're a cop
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and you come upon somebody who's high as a kyte on heroin? >> we would find people in allies. this particular guy, who would overdose on heroin. you come up, most of the times just like elizabeth cohen, you stop breathing. that's what happening. there's an antidote you shoot them up with, nar-can. another amp, you shoot them up. all of a sudden they would come out it, and they would be ticked off with a real bad headache, because you just screwed up their high. >> you would say people in the '70s and '80s people were so worried about crack and cocaine, and now the times are changing. >> and i started to see things change toward the late '90s, started to see a resurgence of heroin, because all of the drug efforts were against cocaine, crack cocaine in the cities, but i'll tell you, when it comes to socioeconomic, no, what the guy i was telling you about who overdosed in his car on dupont
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circle downtown d.c., evening rush hour, was an attorney with a high-powered law firm. >> seeing no limits. mike brooks, thank you very much. i wished we had more time. i'm brooke baldwin "the lead" with jake tapper starts right now. >> when he sang the thrill of getting the picture on "rolling stone" he probably wasn't talking to would-be terrorists. juror b-37 calls on those in power to change the laws that let george zimmerman walk, even after saying that trayvon martin, quote, played a huge role in his own death. our other national lead, if it was a "time" magazine cover, no one would bat an eye, but probably he couldn't do it using